A look at the Time Timer

The Time Timer is a simple, easy-to-use timer that allows you to focus on your work and creativity. In this video, I explain who uses it and why you should consider adding it to your desk.

Recommended book: Sprint


This is the book where I first found out about the Time Timer being used in the business world. It is beautifully designed (set in Adobe Caslon) with fun colors and excellent paper. I recommend the hardcover on Amazon.

Amazon: Buy Sprint by Google by Jake Knapp, John Zeratsky, Braden Kowitz

My Favorite Time Timer: The MOD


The original time timer has a very simple design which can sometimes allow the disk to get stuck. That problem was solved in the “mod” line of timers.

I like this version because it’s simple, clean, and is the right size for personal or mid-sized groups.

Amazon $26.99 — Time Timer Mod 60 minutes — highly recommended

The 120 minute edition


Jake Knapp wrote another great book called Make Time where he designed his own 120 minute version of the Time Timer. I love the color blue. If you like to work for longer stretches, get this one.

Amazon: Buy The Make Time — Time Timer Edition — 120 minutes

The classic


The 8‑inch classic is where it all began. Great for groups of 10–15 people, it can easily be read from anywhere in the room. I recommend saving the box if you intend to store or transport it.

Amazon: Buy The 8‑inch Classic Time Timer

The BIG classic


Here’s a 12-inch version of the original that is really nice for classrooms of 25+ students or team members. It’s no-nonsense and very big and bold to read. I recommend saving the box if you intend to store or transport it.

Amazon: Buy the 12-inch Classic Time Timer

The original desk edition


While I really prefer the MOD version for desk usage, I started my Time Timer journey with the 3‑inch version. I like it because the plastic stand makes it easy to throw in a backpack without it getting damaged.
Amazon: Buy the 3‑inch Desk version

More available at Time Timers website

Read the full backstory. See the other editions available. Browse until you lose track of time...

Visit Official Time Timer Website

What do you think?

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Before-we-start agreements

It can be so easy to jump in to a task, a job, or project.

However, this can create issues. Have you ever been far along in a project and realize you wish you could go back to the beginning and set up an agreement that would allow you to work better? Maybe you’re wishing you would have been paid ahead of time, boundaries on your time, or more realistic deliverables.

Whether you are a salaried employee, freelance contractor, or volunteer committee member, if we’re not careful, we can fall into situations where expectations are misaligned, balls are dropped, and people get frustrated . . . including you.

Here’s a potential solution... set up an agreement

Something you can try is setting up a “before we start” agreement.

Step 1 — Pause your personal work on the project. Before your jump head-first into your project, remember to pause and clarify and agree first. If you’re already working on the project, don’t worry, it’s not too late. Pause now before you do anything else. This is better than waiting until the end!

Step 2 — Create your “front end” agreement. You can also call this your Front-loaded Agreement, Before-We-Start Agreement, Working Expectations Agreement, or Memo-of-Understanding (MOU). It’s important you create this in writing and not just out loud. Having it digital and easily recall-able helps, too. It doesn’t have to be more than 1 typed page with plenty of margins and white space. Here are some potential sections to outline:

  • A short description of the work to be provided
  • Boundaries of time and energy
  • Expectation on delivery date
  • Variables that could change the delivery date or other conditions
  • What this “doesn’t include” section (helpful to keep the scope narrow)

Step 3 — Share the agreement digitally. Share a copy of your document with your boss or team digitally and make sure everyone has enough time to process what’s been written. It’s important they have a copy on their end so they can refer back to it down the road.

Step 4 — Make the agreement and move forward. If you need to make adjustments, do so, then re-send it to everyone. Now that you have the clarity on the expectations and deliverables, you and everyone else is now accountable. You’ve set up the boundaries and your mind will actually be able to relax and focus on the outcome.

How should it look when it’s done?

Have you ever been disappointed when you don’t get the final OK from a client, boss, colleague, or spouse? For many of our jobs and personal commitments, someone else typically decides if the final product is good to go, or if it still needs adjustments or improvements. In other words, you’re not the final green stamp of approval. This can create frustration because you thought you were done . . . only to discover you have to go back and redo work that you thought was perfect. What if I told you that a simple question could change everything?

How should it look when it’s done?

The question “How should it look when it’s done?” is a way of asking someone to “paint done for me.” In other words, you’re asking them to clarify the criteria that will give you their blessing or green light. (If you can get it in writing, even better.) It’s a way of asking what is their version of finished and successful? But we don’t always ask this question.

Too often, we operate with an assumption of what it will look like when it’s done for ourselves. And this is simultaneously happening in the mind of your client, spouse, boss, or colleague, too. We don’t take the time to clarify, define, and get specific on the final outcome. This happens in a split second without much thought or effort — and that’s the problem.

Figuring out what “done” looks like takes a little effort and courage.

Taking time to figure out what done looks like takes a little effort, and a little courage. Productivity writer David Allen often says you have to think harder than you think, but not as hard as you might think. In other words, this thinking process DOES take effort but not as much effort as your brain thinks. Your brain is exaggerating how much time, energy, and thought must be required to clarify.

It’s easier in the short term to leave things unclarified and ambiguous. It’s easy to not ask the question because you don’t want to know the answer. It’s easy not to have to tell your boss that you can’t or aren’t energized to do that thing. It’s easy to commit to a deadline without checking your calendar or other commitments. It’s easy to say yes. It’s easy not to cause a ruckus.
It’s hard to ask a simple question because certainly you have ‘work’ to do. It’s hard to clarify expectations because what if you’re not sure you can pull it off by the proposed deadline and you look incompetent or worse . . . a failure? It’s hard to stop and think for a second because most of us are moving so fast, this behavior is uncommon.

From your own experience you also know that when you leave things a little grey and unclear, that it never ends well on the other end. You know from your own experience that you have so much more freedom to figure things out and make adjustments BEFORE it’s the final hour.

Ask the simple question and negotiate.

Consider asking the simple question “what should this look like when it’s done?”—then step back and what what happens. You may find that clear expectations are communicated. More often than not, you may find that their expectations are too much or not possible. In this position (on the front end of a project before the final hour), you have the opportunity to negotiate. You have the opportunity to disagree. You have the chance to agree on what is realistic for the time needed to complete the project based on the resources you have.

This last part is the key. In these discussions, you are setting yourself up for success, even if you can’t do what is being asked. This is your opportunity to say “while I can’t do that, I can do this.” You must be clear and up front with what you can realistically commit to based on the other circumstances and commitments in your life. Think about your family, your free time, your personal goals. Think about the other “work things” already on your plate that you’ve agreed to. Then talk with your client about what you can agree to accomplish with full energy.

Variations on the question…

  • What does done look like?
  • Paint done for me” (Brenee Brown)
  • What does success look like?
  • What does wild success look like?

Managing your negative inner voice

It’s 6:55 am. You just woke up and realize you have a meeting at 7:30 am and agreed to grab coffee for your coworkers. The line at the drive-thru is always wrapped around the building by 7:00 am and the slow barista is probably working today, but you think you can make it.

You spring out of bed, jump into the shower and do the abbreviated version of your morning routine. You run through the events of your day and it dawns on you that you are having your in-laws over for an early dinner tonight. You agreed with your spouse a few days ago to organize the mess in the living room before they arrive at 5:00pm, but you have a work-related call that’s going to end 30 minutes before that — at the earliest. You devise a plan. As you finish pulling on your socks, you realize: you haven’t yet said a single word today. All of this thinking has happened in your head.

Has anything like this ever happened to you?

Most adults have an inner voice that narrates, reasons, and strategizes all day long. Psychologists call this internal monologue or self-talk. For most adults, the inner voice could be what causes stress in your life.

How you talk to yourself impacts your quality of life and well being.

We all deal with this inner voice differently, but what if managing your inner voice could help you become more productive and pleasant in your life and work?

What if managing your inner voice could help you become more productive and pleasant in your life and work?

Negative talk

Your inner voice is what interprets your boss’s latest comment. Why did he say that? Am I going to get fired? Was it the expression on my face? Why is he always like this?!

Positive talk

On the other hand, your inner voice is what brings meaning and understanding to your life. Oh yeah, I remember why I took this job. I can put up with this. I’ve got this!

We talk to ourselves all the time. You may have heard of the phrase “positive self talk!” — a chant that sounds nice but can seem a little weird. Here’s a different way to think about it: telling ourselves stories.

Telling ourselves stories

We have the ability to tell ourselves stories in our lives. Jonathan Gottschall illustrates how we tell ourselves a stories in his book, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human:

We are, as a species, addicted to story. Even when the body goes to sleep, the mind stays up all night, telling itself stories . . . The storytelling mind is allergic to uncertainty, randomness, and coincidence. It is addicted to meaning. If the storytelling mind cannot find meaningful patterns in the world, it will try to impose them. In short, the storytelling mind is a factory that churns out true stories when it can, but will manufacture lies when it can’t.”

Jonathan Gottschall

Even if you don’t remember your dreams, you may have experienced the joy of waking up and being able to see something so much more clearly. You may have also experienced the opposite: waking up and feeling fear or anxiety about an issue, only to find out later, everything was ok. This is because our brains continue to work while we are sleeping: solving problems and bringing meaning to our lives, even when the meaning is wrong. This can become problematic when we have a negative or wrong mindset regarding issues at work.

Our inner voice intersecting with our work

Many of our jobs today are knowledge-based positions. We make sense of information and make decisions based on inputs. You know this is true because if you’re reading this and following, you probably don’t work in a factory every day. Peter Drucker called this knowledge work. Merlin Mann simplified this by saying we bring value to information.

Bringing value to information in our work requires our brains to be functioning at their best. Too often, as you probably experience, our brains are not at our best. Quieting the negative voice in our heads could be your path to doing better work in your job and making great contributions in your family.

How we talk to ourselves is directly correlated to how productive and pleasant we will be. In other words, managing your inner voice is something you will always have to deal with and it will always impact your working mindset.

A possible solution....

Dr. Neil Fiore, author of The Now Habit: A Strategic Program for Overcoming Procrastination and Enjoying Guilt-Free Play explains that many adults bring over a I have to inner voice from childhood. This “have to” voice leads to procrastination and stress. An example would be I have to do my taxes or I have to attend this event.

According to Fiore, the “have to” voice creates stress and frustration because it reminds us what it was like to be a helpless child when we could not control our schedule and assignments. The reality is, we are no longer children, and while we do have obligations to our families, job, and country, making ourselves do stuff creates a sense of overwhelm and make ourselves feel like a cog in the system.

His solution is to use a “I choose to” voice, which reminds us that we have agency, we have control, we are adults. When you tell yourself I choose to do my taxes (or whatever), you remember you have control over when it gets done and how it will happen. You may not control the deadline, but you do control how you can manage it. This can apply to other tasks in your job and family such as organizing your files, sending an email, or cleaning the toilets.

The secret to managing your inner voice is to remember it needs to be managed. Just like a good manager would do at a great company, consider how you may be able to play the role of the manger for your thoughts. Remind yourself that you have the ability to CHOOSE what to focus your attention on, you can CHOOSE what to ignore, and choose what things you will allow to loop in your brain as you operate in your daily life.